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Fire Marshal

 

 

Fire & Life Safety Tips

 

More than 4,000 Americans die each year in fires and more than 20,000 are injured. Many of them might be alive today if they had only had the information they needed to avoid a disaster. The Grant County Fire Marshal's Office offers the following life-saving tips could make a big difference for you and your community.

 

Cooking Fires

Did you know?

  • Eighty-two percent of all fire deaths occur in the home.

  • Cooking is the leading cause of home fires in the U.S. It is also the leading cause of fire injuries.

  • Deaths due to fires caused by cooking are particularly preventable.

  • Having a working smoke alarm reduces one's chance of dying in a fire by nearly a half.

  • Following these simple fire safety tips can increase your survival rate dramatically.

     

    Cooking Fires Life-Saving Tips

  • Install a smoke alarm on every level of your home. Test smoke alarm batteries every month and change them at least once a year. Consider installing a 10-year lithium battery-powered smoke alarm, which is sealed so it cannot be tampered with or opened.

  • Never leave cooking unattended. A serious fire can start in just seconds.

  • Always wear short, tight-fitting sleeves when cooking.

  • Keep towels, pot holders and curtains away from flames and heating elements.

  • Clean cooking surfaces regularly to prevent grease buildup which can ignite.

  • If a fire breaks out while cooking, put a lid on the pan to smother it. Never throw water on a grease fire.

  • Heat oil gradually to avoid burns from spattering grease. Use extra caution when preparing deep-fried foods.

  • Never use the range or oven to heat your home.

  • Double-check the kitchen before you go to bed or leave the house. Make sure all small appliances are turned off.

  • Grease Fires:

  • If a grease fire erupts in a pan on top of the stove, quickly and carefully cover the pan with a lid or a larger pan. Never use water.

  • If the fire is in the oven, turn the controls off and close the door tightly. This will smother the flames.

  • Have a portable fire extinguisher handy and know how to use it. Make sure it is charged at all times.

  • If you suspect there may be fire still smoldering somewhere in the cabinets or the woodwork after such an experience, don't hesitate to call 9-1-1!


  • Appliances:

  • Use only appliances that have received an Underwriters' Laboratory or Factory Mutual testing label.

  • Do not allow appliance cords to dangle over the edge of counter tops or tables. Children may pull at them and injure themselves. Or you may catch them unintentionally and pull them off the counter.

  • Do not overload electrical circuits. Unplug appliances when not in use. If an appliance smells funny, doesn't function correctly, or has frayed or broken wiring, have it repaired or replaced.

  • Microwave Ovens:

    Burns associated with the use or misuse of microwave ovens are increasing. The scald burn is the most common type of burn and most involve the hands. The age distribution is rather broad, but there continues to be a large number of young children who sustain the more serious burns. The single most common cause of burn injury is simply the fact that people do not expect items heated in the microwave oven to present the same risk as items heated by other more conventional means. The fact that a food container may not be hot may mislead an individual to assume that the food itself is not really hot - thus a burn injury occurs.

  • Puncture plastic pouches and plastic wrap covering before heating. This will reduce the risk of a vapor pressure build up and prevent steam burns.

  • Put a cut in potato skins or other vegetables to reduce the risk of "bursting" when you cut into it after it is heated.

  • Eggs should be removed from the shell before being cooked in the microwave oven. The egg in a shell may explode causing both mechanical and thermal injuries.

  • Identify containers, dishes and utensils that are safe for use in the microwave oven. Some items are not "microwave safe" and may become very hot or even burst when heated in the microwave oven.

  • When using smooth vessels for heating liquids, place a plastic spoon in the vessel during the heating process. This will prevent the "super heated" phenomenon that may result in liquid spattering and scald burns.

  • Check for the presence of metal when reheating some "fast food" items. Aluminum foil, staples in bags, twist-ties, etc. may become very hot and ignite combustible containers.

  • Children who are permitted to operate the microwave oven should be tall enough to be able to safely remove items from the oven. One major risk is facial burns, which occur among children whose height puts their face at the level of the heating chamber of the microwave oven.

  • Be sure children are old enough to understand the safe use of microwave ovens before allowing them to heat foods. Children under the age of seven may not be able to read and follow directions and are at a higher risk potential than older children.

  •  

    Turkey Fryers

     

    Underwriters Laboratories, a non-profit safety certifying organization, issued an alert in June 2001 calling the fryers "extremely dangerous." Citing concerns over stability, oil spillover, overheating and uninsulated pot handles and lids, UL said it would not certify any of the products. The Consumer Product Safety Commission is investigating the products; it has received 30 complaints over three years, including fires.

    The Grant County Fire Marshal's Office discourages the use of turkey fryers. However, if you still choose to use one, we offer this advice:

  • Use turkey fryers outdoors only, well away from combustible decks and buildings and any other material that can burn. Never use turkey fryers on wooden decks or in garages.

  • Make sure the fryers are used on a flat surface to reduce accidental tipping.

  • Never leave the fryer unattended. Most units do not have thermostat controls. If you don't watch the fryer carefully, the oil will continue to heat until it catches fire.

  • Never let children or pets near the fryer when in use. Even after use, never allow children or pets near the turkey fryer. The oil inside the cooking pot can remain dangerously hot, hours after use.

  • To avoid oil spillover, do not overfill the fryer.

  • Use well-insulated potholders or oven mitts when touching pot or lid handles. If possible, wear safety goggles to protect your eyes from oil splatter.

  • Make sure the turkey is completely thawed and be careful with marinades. Oil and water don't mix, and water causes oil to spill over, causing a fire or even an explosion hazard.

  • The National Turkey Federation recommends refrigerator thawing and to allow approximately 24 hours for every five pounds of bird thawed in the refrigerator.

  • Keep an all-purpose fire extinguisher nearby. Never use water to extinguish a grease fire. If the fire gets out of control immediately call 9-1-1 for help.

  •  

    Alternative Heating Fire Safety

    Did you know?

  • Heating is the second leading cause of residential fires.

  • Deaths due to fires caused by heating a home are particularly preventable.

  • Following these simple fire safety tips can increase your survival rate dramatically.

     

    Alternative Heating Fire Safety Life-Saving Tips

  • Install a smoke alarm on every level of your home. Test smoke alarm batteries every month and change them at least once a year. Consider installing a 10-year lithium battery-powered smoke alarm, which is sealed so it cannot be tampered with or opened.

  • Kerosene heaters are not permitted in many areas. If you use a kerosene heater, use only the recommended fuel. Always refuel outdoors safety away from your home.

  • Allow your heater to cool before refueling and only refuel outdoors.

  • Keep the fire in the fireplace by making sure you have a screen large enough to catch flying sparks and rolling logs.

  • Clean your chimney regularly chimney tar build-up can ignite your chimney, roof and the whole house.

  • Space heaters need space. Keep combustibles at least three feet away from each heater.

  • When buying a space heater, look for a control feature that automatically shuts off the power if the heater falls over.

  • Carefully follow manufacturers' installation and maintenance instructions.

  • For wood stove fuel, use only seasoned wood, not green wood, artificial logs or trash.

  • In case of a fire, crawl or stay low to the ground, beneath the smoke, and have an escape plan already worked out. Get out, stay out.

  •  

    Appliance Fire Safety

    Did you know?

  • Each year there are 24,300 residential appliance fires resulting in 100 deaths and 925 injuries.

  • Some electrical fires are caused by electrical system failures and appliance defects. However, many more are caused by misuse, poor maintenance of electrical appliances, incorrectly installed wiring, and overloaded circuits and extension cords.

  • Having a working smoke alarm reduces one's chance of dying in a fire by nearly a half.

  • Following these simple fire safety tips can increase your survival rate dramatically.

     

    Appliance Safety Life-Saving Tips

  • Place a smoke alarm on every level of your home and outside bedrooms. If you keep your bedroom doors closed, place a smoke alarm in each bedroom.

  • Regularly inspect your extension cords for fraying and never use an extension cord as permanent wiring.

  • Instead of a simple extension cord, get a UL-approved unit with built-in circuit breakers.

  • Routinely check your wiring. Look for outlets that don't work, light switches that are hot to the touch and lights that flicker.

  • Never overload outlets or extension cords.

  • Immediately repair appliances or lamps that sputter or spark.

  • Keep appliances away from wet areas, especially in the kitchen, bathroom, basement and garage.

  • If an appliance has a three-prong plug, never force it into a two-slot outlet or extension cord.

  • Don't let children play near electrical space heaters. Keep clothes, curtains and other flammable items at least three feet away from heaters.

  • Prepare and practice a home fire escape plan.

  • In case of a fire, crawl or stay low to the ground, beneath the smoke.

  •  

    Candle Fires

    Did you know?

  • The bedroom is the most common room in the house where candle fires start.

  • Deaths due to candle fires are particularly preventable.

  • Having a working smoke alarm reduces one's chance of dying in a fire nearly one-half.

  • Following these simple fire safety tips can increase your survival rate dramatically.

     

    Candle Fires Life-Saving Tips

  • Install a smoke alarm on every level of your home. Test smoke alarm batteries every month and change them at least once a year. Consider installing a 10-year lithium battery-powered smoke alarm, which is sealed so it cannot be tampered with or opened.

  • Put out candles after use.

  • Keep candles out of reach of children and pets. Children are one of the highest risk groups for death in residential fires.

  • Keep lit candles away from bedding, curtains, papers and anything else that can ignite easily.

  • Ensure candles are in sturdy metal, glass, or ceramic holders and put where they cannot be tipped over.

  • Most candle fires occur in bedrooms. Keep your home, especially the bedrooms, fire-safe.

  • Never leave a lit candle unattended.

  • In case of a fire, stay low to the ground beneath the smoke, and have an escape plan already worked out. Get out, stay out.

  •  

    Careless Smoking

    Did you know?

  • Careless smoking is the second leading cause of fire deaths.

  • Deaths due to fires caused by careless smoking are particularly preventable.

  • Having a working smoke alarm reduces one's chance of dying in a fire by nearly a half.

  • Following these simple fire safety tips can increase your survival rate dramatically.

     

    Careless Smoking Life-Saving Tips

  • Install a smoke alarm on every level of your home. Test smoke alarm batteries every month and change them at least once a year. Consider installing a 10-year lithium battery-powered smoke alarm, which is sealed so it cannot be tampered with or opened.

  • Never smoke in bed. Replace mattresses made prior to the 1973 Federal Mattress Flammability Standard.

  • Don't put ashtrays on the arms of sofas or chairs.

  • Use deep ashtrays and soak ashes in water before disposal.

  • Don't leave cigarettes, cigars or pipes unattended. Put out all smoking materials before you walk away.

  • If you begin to feel drowsy while watching television or reading, extinguish your cigarette or cigar.

  • Close a matchbook before striking and hold it away from your body. Set your cigarette lighter on "low" flame.

  • If smokers have visited, be sure to check the floor and around chair cushions for ashes that may have been dropped accidentally.

  • Develop and practice a fire escape plan. In case of a fire, crawl or stay low to the ground, beneath the smoke, and use the escape plan you have worked out. Get out and stay out.

  •  

    Children and Fire

    Did you know?

  • Each year about 300 people are killed and $280 million in property is destroyed in fires attributed to children playing with fire.

  • Deaths due to children playing with fire are particularly preventable.

  • Having a working smoke alarm reduces one's chance of dying in a fire nearly one-half.

  • Following these simple fire safety tips can increase your survival rate dramatically.

     

    Children & Fire Life-Saving Tips

  • Install a smoke alarm on every level of your home. Test smoke alarm batteries every month and change them at least once a year. Consider installing a 10-year lithium battery-powered smoke alarm, which is sealed so it cannot be tampered with or opened.

  • Keep matches, lighters and other ignitables in a secured drawer or cabinet out of the reach of children.

  • Teach your children to tell you when they find matches and lighters.

  • Always dress children in pajamas that meet federal flammability standards. Avoid dressing children for sleep in loose-fitting 100-percent cotton garments, such as oversized T-shirts.

  • Teach children not to hide from firefighters, but to get out quickly and call for help from another location.

  • Show children how to crawl low on the floor, below the smoke, to get out of the house and stay out.

  • Demonstrate how to stop, drop to the ground, and roll if clothes catch fire.

  • Develop and practice a home fire escape plan and designate a meeting place outside. Get out and stay out.

  • Familiarize children with the sound of your smoke alarm.

  • Replace mattresses made prior to the 1973 Federal Mattress Flammability Standard.

  • Check under beds and in closets for burnt matches, evidence your child may be playing with fire.

  • Fire Escape Planning

    Did you know?

  • Senior citizens, age 65 and older, and children under the age of five are at the greatest risk of death from fire.

  • Deaths due to an inability to escape are particularly preventable.

  • Having a working smoke alarm reduces one's chance of dying in a fire by nearly a half.

  • Following these simple fire safety tips can increase your survival rate dramatically.

     

    Fire Escape Planning Life-Saving Tips

  • Install a smoke alarm on every level of your home. Test smoke alarm batteries every month and change them at least once a year. Consider installing a 10-year lithium battery-powered smoke alarm, which is sealed so it cannot be tampered with or opened.

  • Know your local emergency numbers. In most areas, the number is 911.

  • Practice finding your way out of the house with your eyes closed, crawling or staying low and feeling your way out of the house.

  • Never open doors that are hot to the touch.

  • Teach your family to stop, drop to the ground and roll if their clothes catch fire.

  • Designate a meeting place outside and take attendance. Get out and stay out.

  • Remember to escape first, then notify the fire department.

  • Make sure everyone in your family knows at least two ways to escape from each room in the house.

  •  

    Portable Generators

    Did you know?

  • From 1990-2003, 228 carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning deaths were associated with portable generators, as reported to the CPSC.

  • From 2001 to 2003, the number of reported CO poisoning deaths associated with portable generators doubled.

  • The most common improper placement of portable generators that result in injury or death are in: crawl spaces, basements, and attached garages (within or in close proximity to the home).

  • Following these simple fire safety tips can increase your survival rate dramatically.

     

    Portable Generator Life-Saving Tips

  • Always use generators outdoors, away from doors, windows and vents. NEVER use generators inside homes, garages, basements, crawl spaces, or other enclosed or partially enclosed areas, even with ventilation.

  • Follow the manufacturer's instructions for use.

  • Install battery-operated or plug-in (with battery backup) carbon monoxide alarms in your home, following the manufacturer's instructions.

  • Test CO detectors often and replace batteries when needed.

  • Keep the generator dry. Use on a dry surface under an open, canopy-like structure.

  • Dry your hands before touching the generator.

  • Plug appliances directly into the generator or use a heavy-duty outdoor-rated extension cord. Make sure the entire extension cord is free of cuts or tears and the plug has all 3 prongs, especially a grounding pin.

  • NEVER plug the generator into a wall outlet (known as back-feeding). This practice can cause an electrocution risk to utility workers and others served by the same utility transformer.

  • If you must connect a generator to house wiring, have a qualified electrician install appropriate equipment. Your utility company may be able to install an appropriate transfer switch as well.

  • Before refueling the generator, turn it off and let it cool. Fuel spilled on hot engine parts could ignite.

  • Always store fuel outside of living areas in properly labeled, non-glass containers.

  • Store fuel away from any fuel-burning appliance.

  •  

    Holiday Fire Safety

    Did you know?

  • There are an estimated 200 fires and 25 injuries resulting from Christmas tree fires each year.

  • Most holiday fires can be easily prevented.

  • Having a working smoke alarm reduces one's chance of dying in a fire by nearly a half.

  • Following these simple fire safety tips can increase your survival rate dramatically.

     

    Holiday Fire Safety Life-Saving Tips

  • Install a smoke alarm on every level of your home. Test smoke alarm batteries every month and change them at least once a year. Consider installing a 10-year lithium battery-powered smoke alarm, which is sealed so it cannot be tampered with or opened.

  • Do not place your tree close to a heat source, including fireplace or heat vent. The heat will dry out the tree and cause it to more easily ignited by heat, flame or sparks.

  • Never put Christmas tree branches or needles in a fireplace or woodburning stove.

  • When the tree becomes dry, discard it promptly. The best way to dispose of your tree is to take it to a recycling center or have it collected by a community pick-up service.

  • Inspect holiday lights each year for frayed wire, bare spots, gaps in the insulation, broken or cracked sockets, and excessive kinking or wear.

  • Only use UL-approved lighting.

  • Do not overload outlets. Connect strings of lights to an extension cord before plugging the cord into the outlet.

  • Do not leave lit holiday lights unattended.

  • Avoid using lit candles. If you do use them, make sure they are in stable holders and place them where they can not be easily knocked over.

  • Never leave the house with candles burning.

  •  

    Seniors and Fire

    Did you know?

  • Americans over the age of 65 are one of the groups at highest risk of dying in a fire.

  • People age 65-75 are twice as likely as the general population, 75-85 are three times as likely, and 85+ are four and one-half times as likely to be killed in a house fire.

  • Having a working smoke alarm reduces one's chance of dying in a fire by nearly a half.

  • Following these simple fire safety tips can increase your survival rate dramatically.

     

    Seniors and Fire Life-Saving Tips

  • Install a smoke alarm on every level of your home. Test smoke alarm batteries every month and change them at least once a year. Consider installing a 10-year lithium battery-powered smoke alarm, which is sealed so it cannot be tampered with or opened.

  • The kitchen is a high danger zone for fire, so be extra cautious when cooking. Remember not to leave food unattended and don't wear loose clothing when cooking.

  • Never use the range or oven to heat your home.

  • Double-check the kitchen to be sure the oven and all small appliances are turned off before going to bed or leaving the house.

  • Never smoke in bed. Replace mattresses made prior to the 1973 Federal Mattress Flammability Standard.

  • Keep flammable materials, such as drapes and clothing, at least three feet away from your heater.

  • Don't overload electrical outlets.

  • Develop and practice a home fire escape plan.

  • In case of fire, crawl or stay low to the ground, beneath the smoke. Get out. Stay out.

  •  

    Winter Fires

    Did you know?

  • Eighty-two percent of all fire deaths occur in the home.

  • Electrical fires are a special concern during the winter months, which call for more indoor activities and increased use of lighting, heating and appliances.

  • Deaths caused by winter fires are particularly preventable.

  • Following these simple fire safety tips can increase your survival rate dramatically.

     

    Winter Fires Life-Saving Tips

  • Install a smoke alarm on every level of your home. Test smoke alarm batteries every month and change them at least once a year. Consider installing a 10-year lithium battery-powered smoke alarm, which is sealed so it cannot be tampered with or opened.

  • Make sure wood stoves are properly installed, away from combustible surfaces, have the proper floor support and adequate ventilation. Never use flammable liquids (such as gasoline) to start or accelerate fire.

  • Make sure your space heaters have an emergency shut off in case they tip over. Kerosene heaters are not permitted in many areas. ONLY use the fuel recommended by the manufacturer. Never refill a space heater while it is operating or still hot. Refuel outside, away from the house.

  • Have your furnace and chimney professionally inspected annually and cleaned if necessary. Chimney tar build-up is a common cause of chimney fires.

  • Use a glass or metal screen in front of your fireplace to prevent sparks igniting nearby carpets or furniture.

  • Never thaw frozen pipes with a blow torch or other open flame. Use hot water or a UL listed device such as a hand-held dryer.

  • Dispose of hot ashes in metal containers placed away from the house.

  • Never use the range or oven to heat your home.

  • If there is a fire hydrant near your home, keep it clear of snow for easy access.


  • Practice Water Safety While on Vacation

     

    Whether vacationing on a beach in California, staying at a hotel with a pool, visiting relatives or friends who own pools, taking a tubing trip down a river or boating on a lakeÖ water safety must be practiced wherever water is present!

    Here are some simple water safety tips to follow when planning your next family vacation:

    • Enforce the same safety rules you use at home. Take time to explain the importance of following these same rules to your children.

    • Never allow children to swim unsupervised in a hotel/motel pool: Never assume someone else is watching your child.

    • Check out the pool before you swim: Is the water clean and clear? Where is the deep end? Is there a lifeguard on duty? Where is the rescue equipment, and how is it used? Where is the phone, and can you dial out directly?

    • When staying at a relative or friendís home, look for possible water hazards
      (pools, ponds, buckets, bathtubs, toilets, dog bowls, etc.).

    • When boating, wear a Coast Guard approved lifejacket: When planning boating events, make sure to pack a lifejacket for each person. Children are required to wear a lifejacket at all times in a boat in many states. Bring along other items that float such as cooler, cushions, etc.

    • Know what is in and under an open water area: Find out about hazards such as marine life, parasites, currents, drop-offs, very cold water, or submerged objects. Enter all unfamiliar water feet first.

    • If the water is shared by boats, BE VISIBLE: Have your child wear a bright
      colored swim cap, stay close to shore, and actively watch for boats.

    • Know what to do if your child falls in the river: Go downstream immediately to position yourself to help.

    •  

    Bathtub Safety

     

    Nationally, about 80 children die from bathtub drowning. Here are some tips for keeping your child safe in the tub:

    • Supervision. NEVER leave a child unattended in the bathtub for ANY REASON. There is nothing important enough to risk drowning! Children can drown in just a few inches of water, and can easily topple into the tub while youíre dashing out to answer the phone, get a towel, etc.
      * Donít run to answer the phone.
      * Donít check to see whoís at the door.
      * Donít leave your child to be watched by an older brother or sister.
       

    MAKE NO EXCEPTIONS TO THESE RULES!

    • Bath seats. Several types of bath seats and rings adhere to the bottom of the tub with suction cups and offer bathing infants and toddlers support while sitting. Don't think that you can leave your child unattended. The suction cups can come loose, and it isn't hard for a child to slide out of the seats.

    • Get supplies first. Collect soap, towel, diaper, clothing, toys, and any other items you plan on using before you even run the bath water. Place these items where you can reach them easily.

    • Water heater. To reduce the risk of scalding, set your home's water heater to a maximum of 120 degrees Fahrenheit. A good test: You should be able to hold your hand comfortably under the tap even when the hot water alone is running.

    • Faucet covers. Placing a soft, insulated cover over the bathtub faucet is a prudent safeguard against accidental burns or bumps. They are available at many baby-supplies stores.

    • Slips and Falls. Prevent bathtub slips and falls by placing a rubber mat in the tub or affixing non-slip adhesive decals or strips to the bottom of the tub.

    • Electrical hazards. Keep electrical devices (including hair dryers, curling irons, and electric razors) well away from the tub.

    • Slippery floors. Be sure to use (and teach your child to use) extra caution and keep a non-slip bathroom rug by the side of the tub for your child to step onto after bathing.

    •  


    Bucket Safety

     

    Buckets filled with water or other liquids, especially the large five-gallon size, present a drowning hazard to small children. In Phoenix alone, 5 drowning incidents involving buckets, including three fatalities were reported in 2001.

    Nationally, about 25 children drown every year in buckets, and many more are hospitalized. Many of the containers involved in drownings nationally were 5-gallon buckets containing liquids. Most were used for mopping floors or other household chores. Many were less than half full.

    A young childís curiosity, along with their crawling and pulling up while learning to walk can lead to danger when buckets are used around the house. Curious children lean forward to play in the water. When they topple into the bucket, they are unable to free themselves and drown.

    The 5-gallon bucket is particularly dangerous because its heavier weight makes it more stable than a smaller bucket, and unlikely to tip over when a child uses it to pull up. These containers are about half the height of the infants, and with several gallons of water, weigh more than children of that age.

  • Never leave any bucket of water or other liquid unattended when small children are around.

  • Even a partly filled bucket can be a drowning hazard.

  • When doing household chores, immediately empty out buckets when finished, or move them to a safe place before taking a break.

  • ALWAYS watch your children around water, inside the home, around the pool and around the yard.

  •  

    Fireworks Safety

     

    It is extremely important to know the difference between a legal consumer firework and a dangerous explosive device. Items such as M-80s, M-100s and blockbusters are not fireworks, they are federally banned explosives. They can cause serious injury or even death. Stay away from anything that isn't clearly labeled with the name of the item, the manufacturer's name and instructions for proper use.

    Here are some more tips to help ensure a safe Fourth of July:

  • Fireworks are not toys. Fireworks complying with strict regulations enacted by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission in 1976 function primarily by burning to produce motion and visible or audible effects. They are burning at approximately the same temperature as a household match and can cause burn injuries and ignite clothing if used improperly.

  • NEVER give fireworks to young children. Close, adult supervision of all fireworks activities is
    mandatory. Even sparklers can be unsafe if used improperly.

  • Select and use only legal devices. If you choose to celebrate the Fourth of July with fireworks, check with your local police department to determine what fireworks can be legally discharged in your area.

  • Stay away from illegal explosives. Illegal explosive devices continue to cause serious injuries around the Fourth of July holiday. These devices are commonly known as M-80s, M-100s, blockbusters or quarter-pounders. Federally banned since 1966, these items will not contain the manufacturer's name and are usually totally unlabeled. Don't purchase or use unlabeled fireworks. If you are aware of anyone selling such devices, contact your local police department.

  • Homemade fireworks are deadly. Never attempt to make your own devices and do not purchase or use any kits that are advertised for making fireworks. Mixing and loading chemical powders is very dangerous and can kill or seriously injure you. Leave the making of fireworks to the experts.

  • Have a fire extinguisher or bucket of water handy, as well as a first aid kit. Call 911 should a fire ignite or if someone becomes injured.

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